Milo Hsieh

Ko Is All but Certain to Run for President, but Ambiguity Plagues His Policy Proposals.

On March 20th, Taipei Ko Wen-je spoke at the Heritage Foundation in Washington DC to outline his experiences as Taipei mayor, emphasizing his status as an anti-establishment politician. Despite not having announced his intention to campaign for president in 2020 just yet, the content of Ko’s speech suggests that he indeed plans on running for president... Read More

An Analysis of the Implications and Strategy of Taiwan’s Gay Marriage Bill Going Forward

Taiwan's Executive Yuan has proposed a draft for same-sex marriage legislation earlier this month. This draft proposes to legalize same-sex marriage, but under a different framework of law than the ones currently in effect for straight couples. The bill has currently passed its second reading, though splits have emerged between parties regarding whether to advance the current bill or amend the bill further... Read More

Why Is AIT so Anxious About an Independence Referendum in Taiwan?

Responding to a call for progress towards an independence referendum, the American Institute in Taiwan, America’s de facto embassy in Taiwan has explicitly rejected efforts to change Taiwan’s status quo. The move is paradoxical. While the US praises Taiwan for its democracy and states that the decisions to island’s future should be left to the people of Taiwan, it at the same time hopes to discourage the people of Taiwan from making a decision on their political future... Read More

Recent Cases of Violence in Taiwan Indicate Challenge to Social Progress

Over the past few weeks, there have been multiple cases of high-profile physical violence in Taiwan, ranging from the case of the abuse of a wife and son by a father to the assault on Minister of Culture Cheng Li-chiun by an entertainer. In both of these high profile cases, certain levels of “vigilante justice” through violence have been argued as justified, despite a general public consensus against acts of physical violence in Taiwan. What do these cases say about Taiwan society as a whole?... Read More
Milo Hsieh

Milo Hsieh

Milo Hsieh studies international relations at American University in Washington, DC. From Hsinchu, Taiwan with both parents working in tech, but has a passion following the post-Sunflower movement youth and civil movement in Taiwan, he is most interested in observing how culture intersects with politics.

謝和軒,新竹人,淡水長大。雖然討厭台灣政治教育與家庭的權威與無知文化,但還是知道這島國還是心裡不可分割的一部分。自己一人在華府讀書打拼,風大雨大時會莫名其妙的想家,喜歡貢丸但對米粉無感。